Highlights of Reports on Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Released in 2003

bulletAll reports by year of release

bulletAll reports released in 2003 (listed from most recent to earliest release):
  • In 2002, 3 percent of pregnant women aged 15 to 44 used illicit drugs in the past month, 3 percent reported binge alcohol use, and 17 percent reported smoking cigarettes in the past month.  Among pregnant women aged 15 to 44, whites were more likely to have smoked cigarettes in the past month than blacks or Hispanics.  The use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs in the past month among recent mothers was similar to that of nonpregnant women but higher than among pregnant women.   See  The NSDUH Report:  Pregnancy and Substance Use.

  • In SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), the number of treatment admissions in which narcotic painkillers were involved was relatively stable between 1992 and 1997 but doubled between 1992 and 2000.  In 1992, the treatment admission rate for narcotic painkiller abuse was 13 admissions per 100,000 persons aged 12 or older. By 2000, it had increased to 27 admissions per 100,000.   See  The DASIS Report: Treatment Admissions Involving Narcotic Painkillers.

  • In SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) 16 percent of the linked admission/ discharge records represented clients who received intensive outpatient substance abuse treatment. Intensive outpatient treatment is defined as treatment that lasts at least two or more hours per day for three or more days per week. It does not include regular outpatient treatment or outpatient detoxification. The completion rate for intensive outpatient treatment was higher (41%) than for all outpatient treatment (34%).  See The DASIS Report:  Discharges from Intensive Outpatient Treatment, 2000.

  • The National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services  (N-SSATS) is part of the Drug and Alcohol Services Information System (DASIS), a cooperative program between the State substance abuse agencies and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to collect data on substance abuse services. SAMHSA's National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) is designed to collect and report data on the location, characteristics, and utilization of services at alcohol and drug abuse treatment facilities (both public and private) throughout the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and other U.S. jurisdictions.  See The DASIS Report:  The National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS).

  • SAMHSA's 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) examined the number of days, average number of drinks per day, and driving under the influence of alcohol among current drinkers.  Current drinking is defined as any alcohol in the past month.  While underaged persons were less likely to be current drinkers, those  underaged persons who were current drinkers averaged more drinks per day of use than adults aged 21 and older. Young adults aged 18 to 25 who were current drinkers were more likely than any other age group to drive under the influence of alcohol in the past year.  See The NSDUH Report:  Quantity and Frequency of Alcohol Use.

  • SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) records up to three substances of abuse and the route of administration of each substance.  In 2000, there were 215,000 treatment admissions reported to TEDS that involved injection of one or more of the three drugs reported.   About 19 percent of admissions reporting injection of drugs reported injection of two or more drugs.  The most common combination of drugs injected was heroin and cocaine. Treatment admissions by racial and ethnic groups differed in the types of multiple drugs injected.  See The DASIS Report: Treatment Admissions for Injection of Multiple Drugs: 2000.

  • Of the 23,000 admissions in SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) that involved benzodiazepines, only 19 percent were for primary benzodiazepine use; 81 percent were reported as secondary to the use of alcohol or another drug.  Primary benzodiazepine admissions were more than twice as likely as other admissions to have a psychiatric problem in addition to substance abuse (40 vs. 17 percent), which is consistent with the use of benzodiazepines in the treatment of some psychiatric disorders.  See The DASIS Report:  Characteristics of Primary Benzodiazepine Admissions:  2000.
  • In 2002, approximately 3.2 million young adults aged 18 to 24 were considered to be school dropouts.  SAMHSA's 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health compared the rates of smoking, drinking, and illegal drug use among young adult dropouts and non-dropouts.  See The NSDUH Report:  Substance Use Among School Dropouts.

  • In 2002,  SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health found that 26 percent of persons aged 12 or older in the United States (61 million persons) were current smokers, that is, smoked cigarettes in the past month.   Males were more likely than females to be current smokers; but among the current smokers, a higher percentage of females than males smoked daily.  See The NSDUH Report:  Quantity and Frequency of Cigarette Use.

  • Of the 13,843 facilities responding to SAMHSA's 2002 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS), 7 percent served primarily clients younger than age 18.  These "adolescent" facilities were more likely than adult facilities to offer special programs for clients with co-occurring substance abuse and psychological problems.  In adolescent facilities, the majority of clients were treated for both alcohol and drug abuse problems.  About 8 percent of the clients in adolescent facilities were treated for only alcohol abuse compared with 22 percent in adult facilities.    See The DASIS Report: Facilities Primarily Serving Adolescents: 2002.

  • Heroin was the leading illicit drug among substance abuse treatment admissions in 2000, reported by 15 percent of the 1.6 million substance abuse treatment admissions in SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS). The proportion of new heroin users admitted to substance abuse treatment who were younger than 25 years old increased from 30 to 41 percent between 1992 and 2000.  In 1992, 48 percent of new heroin users age 18 to 24 reported injection as the route of heroin administration.  By 2000, almost two-thirds (63 percent) reported injection as the route of administration for heroin.  See The DASIS Report:  New Heroin Users Admitted to Treatment: 1992-2000.
  • In 2002, about 11 million persons aged 12 or older reported driving under the influence of illegal drugs during the past year.  That is, 31 percent of past year illicit drug users were under the influence of illegal drugs while driving at least once in the past year ("drugged driving").  This report provides the drugged driving rates by gender, race/ethnicity, geographic locations, county type, current employment, and educational level.  See The NSDUH Report:  Drugged Driving, 2002 Update.

  • SAMHSA's Office of Applied Studies recently added a new component to its online analysis capabilities called Quick Tables.  This report illustrates the use of Quick Tables to analyze the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) files.  See The DASIS Report:  Introducing Quick Tables.

  • SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH), formerly called the National Household Survey on Drug Use, provides the prevalence of substance use in the U.S.  The 2002 NSDUH estimates that among the general population age 12 and older:  120 million Americans were current alcohol users, 75.1 million Americans were current tobacco users, and 19.5 million Americans were current illicit drug users.  An estimated 22 million Americans were classified with abuse or dependence on either alcohol, illicit drugs or both.  See 2002 National Survey on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH).
  • Based on SAMHSA's National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS), facilities with a specially designed treatment program were likely to offer related services.  For example, those with a specially designed treatment program or group for clients with co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders were likely to offer mental health assessment and pharmacotherapy; those  for pregnant women were likely to provide social services, child care assistance, and domestic violence education; and those for persons with HIV/AIDS to provide testing services, e.g., for HIV, TB, hepatitis, and STD.  See The DASIS Report:  Services Provided by Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities.

  • According to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), more than 120,000 admissions to substance abuse treatment in 2000 were homeless at time of admission.  Admissions who were homeless were more likely to be veterans and were older (average age 38 years) than admissions who were not homeless (age 33).   Among the homeless:  whites were most likely to be admitted for alcohol (61%) and opiates (17%); Blacks for alcohol (37%), smoked cocaine (37%), and opiates (15%); Hispanics for alcohol (48%) and opiates (33%); American Indians/Alaska Natives for alcohol (80%); and Asian/Pacific Islanders for alcohol (45%), stimulants (21%), and opiates (13%).  See The DASIS Report:  Characteristics of Homeless Admissions to Substance Abuse Treatment.
  • Based on SAMHSA's 2000 Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), admissions with non-heroin opiates as a primary substance of abuse accounted for 26,900 (10 percent) of the 269,400 opiate admissions.  Methadone treatment was planned for 19 percent of the non-heroin opiate treatment admissions.  Non-heroin opiate admissions with planned methadone treatment were almost twice as likely as admissions with no planned methadone treatment to be self- or individually referred (81 vs. 43 percent).   Among the non-heroin opiate admissions, methadone treatment was planned for 66 percent of Asian/Pacific Islanders, 24 percent of Blacks, 20 percent of Hispanics, 17 percent of American Indian/Alaska Natives, and 17 percent of Whites.  See The DASIS Report:  Planned Methadone Treatment for Non-Heroin Opiate Admissions.
  • Past month smoking was reported in SAMHSA's 2001 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse by 13 percent of youth aged 12-17, 39 percent of adults aged 18-25, and 24 percent of adults aged 26 and older.  This report presents the cigarette brand preferences by age group, race/ethnicity, and region.  See The NHSDA Report:  Cigarette Brand Preferences.
  • Based on SAMHSA's annual National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS), 82 percent of the nation's substance abuse treatment facilities offered outpatient care in 2000.  "Outpatient" care provided included not only regular outpatient visits but also intensive outpatient treatment (defined as a minimum of 2 hours per day on 3 or more days per week), detoxification, and day treatment with partial hospitalization.  Almost one-quarter of facilities offering outpatient care offered treatment in Spanish.  See The DASIS Report:  Facilities Offering Outpatient Care.

  • Of the 13,428 facilities responding to SAMHSA's 2000 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS), 9 percent offered hospital inpatient care.  At least 90 percent of the facilities providing hospital inpatient care for substance abuse treatment also provided the following services:  comprehensive substance abuse assessment, individual therapy, group therapy, drug/alcohol urine screening, discharge planning, and referral to other transitional services. About 74 percent of the hospital inpatient facilities provided programs for persons with co-occurring disorders.  See The DASIS Report:  Facilities Offering Hospital Inpatient Care. 

  • Methadone treatment was planned for 40 percent of all heroin admissions reported to SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) in 2000.  The planned use of methadone to treat heroin addiction varied by State.  The nine States with the highest proportion of planned methadone treatment were:  California, Colorado, Indiana, Hawaii, Iowa, Ohio, Alaska, North Carolina, and New Jersey.  See The DASIS Report:  Planned Methadone Treatment for Heroin Admissions.

  • Based on SAMHSA's National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS), most of the substance abuse treatment facilities providing only detoxification services were very small or small.  Very large facilities were more likely to provide treatment in languages other than English (53 percent), methadone/LAAM treatment (38 percent), HIV testing (51 percent), hepatitis testing (43 percent), testing for sexually transmitted diseases (40 percent), pharmacotherapy (59 percent), transitional housing assistance (35 percent), programs for persons with AIDS/HIV (37 percent), and programs for pregnant/postpartum women (34 percent).  See The DASIS Report:  Variations in Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities by Number of Clients.

  •  SAMHSA's Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) public use file contains 9.6 million records.  This report illustrates how trends in substance abuse treatment admissions from 1995 to 2000 can be analyzed in the four Census regions of the country, using heroin as a substance of abuse as an example.  Using SAMHSA's online data analysis system, you can get percentages of substance abuse treatment admissions in each region, trends from 1995 to 2000, statistical testing, and various graphs of the results.  See The DASIS Report:  Graphing Multi-year Analyses of TEDS.

  • Based on SAMHSA's National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) survey of 13,428 facilities in 2000, 27 percent of the nation's treatment facilities offered residential care.  Most (75 percent) of the residential facilities were private not-for-profit organizations.  Types of payment for treatment accepted included self pay (84 percent), private health insurance (57 percent), Medicaid (39 percent), and Medicare (18 percent).  About 44 percent of the residential facilities had contracts with managed care organizations.  About 47 percent of the residential facilities said they offered programs for persons with co-occurring disorders (substance abuse and mental illness).   See The DASIS Report:  Facilities Offering Residential Care.

  • SAMHSA's Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator includes outpatient treatment programs, residential treatment programs, hospital inpatient programs, and partial hospitalization / day treatment programs for drug addiction and alcoholism in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, the Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the Virgin Islands.  This report provides guidance on using such features on SAMHSA's Locator as the Quick Search, Detailed Search, and List Search.  See Using the Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator.  

  • SAMHSA's National Household Survey on Drug Abuse estimates that in 2001, about 10.1 million persons aged 12 to 20 used alcohol in the past month.  Nearly 3 million of this age group were dependent on or abused alcohol in the past year but only about 400,000 received any type of alcohol treatment in the past year.  Furthermore, nearly 3 million persons aged 16 to 20 were estimated to have driven under the influence of alcohol at least once in the past year.  See The NHSDA Report:  Alcohol Use by Persons Under the Legal Drinking Age of 21.

  • Regardless of level of urbanization, alcohol was the leading substance of abuse for American Indian / Alaska Native treatment admissions.  American Indian / Alaska Native treatment admissions in non-metro areas without a city were less likely than other metropolitan areas to have opiates, cocaine, or stimulants as their primary substance of abuse. Opiates were the primary substance of abuse among American Indian / Alaska Native substance abuse treatment admissions in large metropolitan areas.  See The DASIS Report:   American Indian / Alaska Native Treatment Admissions in Rural & Urban Areas:  2000.

  • In 2000, Hispanic females aged 12 to 17 were at higher risk for suicide than other youths.  Only 32 percent of Hispanic female youths at risk for suicide during the past year, however, received mental health treatment during this same time period.  Hispanic female youths born in the United States were at higher risk than Hispanic female youths born outside the United States.  But rates of suicide risk were similar among Hispanic female youths across regions and ethnic subgroups (e.g., Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American and Cuban).  See The NHSDA Report:  Risk of Suicide Among Hispanic Females Aged 12 to 17.

  • For people who want to do their own analysis, this report provides an overview of the SAMHDA search tool, a new feature that searches the question text, the variable labels, and value labels to find the variables of interest.  In addition, the report provides search tips  and examples of the variable level search utility, using SAMHSA's 2001 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA).  See The NHSDA Report:  Finding Specific Variables in the NHSDA.

  • In 60 percent of the substance abuse treatment admissions involving marijuana in 2000, marijuana was reported as less significant or secondary to abuse of another substance. Among secondary marijuana admissions, 56 percent had alcohol as the primary substance of abuse, 21 percent had cocaine, 11 percent stimulants, 10 percent opiates, and 2 percent other substances.  See The DASIS Report:  Marijuana Use Secondary to Other Substances of Abuse.

  • Co-occurring disorders admissions were less likely to be in the labor force than substance abuse only admissions (47 percent vs. 58 percent).   Co-occurring disorders admissions to substance abuse treatment were more likely to have been referred through alcohol, drug abuse, and other health care providers.  In contrast,  substance abuse only admissions  were more likely to have been referred to treatment by the criminal justice system.  See The DASIS Report:  Admissions of Persons with Co-Occurring Disorders,  2000.

  • In 2000, among the 1.5 million adult substance abuse admissions (age 18 or older), 154,400 were admitted as primary marijuana abusers.   A majority of these adult marijuana admissions were White (54 percent), followed by Black (30 percent), Hispanic (9 percent), American Indian/Alaska Native (2 percent), and Asian/Pacific Islander (1 percent).    See The DASIS Report:  Adult Marijuana Treatment Admissions by Race and Ethnicity,  2000.

  • From 1999 to 2001, an annual average of 338,000 persons aged 12 or older used a needle to inject cocaine, heroin, or stimulants during the past year.  The last time injection drug users used a needle for injecting drugs, 14 percent of past year injection drug users knew or suspected someone else had used the needle before them.  See The NHSDA Report:  Injection Drug Use.

  • From 1990 to 1998, the annual number of new cigar users climbed steadily from almost 2 million in 1990 to nearly 5 million in 1998.   Between 1998 and 1999, however, the number of new cigar users decreased 22 percent.  See The NHSDA Report:  Cigar Use .

  • According to SAMHSA's 1999 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, an estimated 833,000 youths between the ages of 12 and 17 had carried a handgun in the past year.  See The NHSDA Report: Youth Who Carry Handguns.

  • Almost 60 percent of recent marijuana initiates had used both cigarettes and alcohol prior to using marijuana.  Recent marijuana initiates who used marijuana for the first time before the age of 15, however,  were more likely to have used marijuana before using cigarettes or alcohol than those who first used marijuana at age 15 or older. See The NHSDA Report:  Characteristics of New Marijuana Users.

This page was last updated on December 30, 2008.