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Early Childhood Materials

Part III: Trauma Resources

  • National Institute of Mental Health's National Children's Mental Health Awareness Day 2011 Panel Webcast
    (http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?Live=10089 Exit Disclaimer)
    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
    As part of Awareness Day 2011, NIMH sponsored a webcast panel of children's mental health researchers and experts who discussed the science of children's mental health.
  • Fact Sheets about Children and Adolescents
    (http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/childrens-mental-health-awareness-day/childrens-mental-health-awareness-day-may-3-2011.shtml Exit Disclaimer)
    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
    This collection of fact sheets addresses various mental health challenges experienced by young children and adolescents.
  • Adults and Children Together Against Violence
    (http://actagainstviolence.apa.org/ Exit Disclaimer)
    American Psychological Association
    This research-based information provides skills for adults through simple, accessible, user-friendly messages and materials meant to educate communities and adults to create safe, healthy environments that protect children and youth from violence.
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences Study
    (www.cdc.gov/ace Exit Disclaimer)
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    This Web site describes one of the largest investigations ever conducted to assess associations between childhood maltreatment and later-life health and well-being. The ACE Study findings suggest that certain experiences are major risk factors for the leading causes of illness and death as well as poor quality of life in the United States. Progress in preventing and recovering from the nation's worst health and social problems is likely to benefit from understanding that many of these problems arise as a consequence of adverse childhood experiences.
  • Building Resilience―Practical Tips and Tools
    (http://www.zerotothree.org/maltreatment/31-1-prac-tips-beardslee.pdf Exit Disclaimer)
    ZERO TO THREE
    This tip sheet includes information on understanding resilience, promoting resilience, and helping parents build resilience.
  • Children & Disasters: Promoting Adjustment and Helping Children Cope
    (http://www.aap.org/disasters/adjustment.cfm Exit Disclaimer)
    American Academy of Pediatrics
    This collection of resources offers children and their families help to understand and cope with a personal loss.
  • Child Abuse
    (http://healthykids.us/chapters/abuse_main.htm Exit Disclaimer)
    Healthy Kids, Healthy Care, National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education
    These resources answer key questions regarding child abuse.
  • Child Protection: Facts and Figures
    (http://www.cwla.org/programs/childprotection/childprotectionfaq.htm Exit Disclaimer)
    Child Welfare League of America
    The Child Welfare League of America provides information on child protection and preventing and reporting child abuse.
  • ChildTrauma Articles Library
    (http://www.childtrauma.org/index.php/articles Exit Disclaimer)
    ChildTrauma Academy
    These complementary articles address various topics and are applicable to caregivers and professionals.
  • Child Welfare Information Gateway
    (www.childwelfare.gov Exit Disclaimer)
    Administration for Children and Families
    Child Welfare Information Gateway connects child welfare and related professionals to comprehensive information and resources to help protect children and strengthen families. It features the latest on topics from prevention to permanency, including child abuse and neglect, foster care, and adoption. A complete listing of products can be found in the Publications Catalog: http://www.childwelfare.gov/catalog/ Exit Disclaimer. Mental Health specific resources can be found on www.childwelfare.gov/systemwide/mentalhealth Exit Disclaimer.
  • Children and Youth Resource Collection
    (http://www.samhsa.gov/dtac/dbhis/dbhis_children_bib.asp)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    This Web page includes a listing of SAMHSA-recommended books, activities, tips and guides, and assessment tools.
  • Coming Together Around Military Families
    (http://www.zerotothree.org/about-us/funded-projects/military-families/ Exit Disclaimer)
    ZERO TO THREE
    This Web page is a part of a ZERO TO THREE effort to support military families so that parents and professionals can more effectively care for very young children and their families.
  • Coping Strategies for You and Your Child During Deployment or When a Crisis Occurs
    (http://www.zerotothree.org/site/DocServer/LLdeployment.pdf?docID=381&AddInterest=1157 Exit Disclaimer)
    ZERO TO THREE
  • Dealing with Death for Small Children
    (http://www.alleghenycounty.us/uploadedFiles/DHS/About_DHS/Publications/Resource_Guides/ParentPagesVol2Iss3DealingwithDeath.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer)
    Safe Start, Allegheny County, Department of Human Services
  • Disaster Relief and Trauma
    (http://www.zerotothree.org/site/PageServer?pagename=key_disaster&AddInterest=1142 Exit Disclaimer)
    ZERO TO THREE
    ZERO TO THREE offers various materials and guides for parents, professionals, and policy makers.
  • Disaster Resource Center
    (http://www.aacap.org/cs/MilitaryFamilies.ResourceCenter Exit Disclaimer)
    American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
    AACAP's disaster resource center includes answers to frequently asked questions; clinical resources; information on how to get help; and links to videos, books, research, trainings, and other resources.
  • Education and Resource Center
    (http://www.theannainstitute.org/ Exit Disclaimer)
    The Anna Institute
    The Anna Institute celebrates and honors the life of Anna Caroline Jennings by using her artwork and life experience to educate others on the hidden epidemic of childhood trauma, its horrific lifelong impacts on society, and paths to prevention and healing.
  • Early Childhood Trauma
    (http://nctsn.org/trauma-types/early-childhood-trauma Exit Disclaimer)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the impact of traumatic experiences. Young children—even infants—may be affected by events that threaten their safety or the safety of their parents/caregivers, and their symptoms have been well documented. This Web page provides related resources.
  • Fact Sheet: Talking to Kids about Fear and Violence
    (http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/farcry/go/information/get-info/children-s-mental-health/talking-to-kids-about-fear-and-violence Exit Disclaimer)
    Mental Health America
  • Helping Heal the Invisible Wounds of Exposure to Violence: A Guide for Families—in English
    (http://www.safestartcenter.org/pdf/caregiver.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer) and in Spanish (http://www.safestartcenter.org/pdf/caregiver-spanish.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer) and A Quick Reference Card—in English (http://www.safestartcenter.org/pdf/CEVcard.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer)
    Safe Start, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
    This overview covers common signs and symptoms of exposure to violence at different stages of children's development, as well as strategies for parents or caregivers to help children heal. It also provides a list of resources.
  • Helping Young Children and Families Cope with Trauma
    (http://www.nctsn.org/nctsn_assets/pdfs/Helping_Young_Children_and_Families_Cope_with_Trauma.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    This family friendly guide describes the signs of trauma for young children and how families can help.
  • Impact of Trauma
    (http://www.zerotothree.org/maltreatment/trauma/trauma.htmlExit Disclaimer)
    ZERO TO THREE
    ZERO TO THREE offers various materials and guides for parents, professionals, and policy makers.
  • Implications of Historical Trauma among American Indian/Alaska Native Boys and Men (http://www.acclaroresearch.com/spo/healthdisparities/pdf/BraveHeart.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer)
    Native American and Disparities Research, University of New Mexico
    A PowerPoint on historical trauma.
  • Intergenerational Trauma and Historical Grief in American Indians (http://opi.mt.gov/pdf/indianed/Ottenbacher.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer)
    Melanie Ottenbacher
    A PowerPoint presentation on historical trauma.
  • Lessons Learned from Interventions to Address Infant Mental Health in Early Head Start
    (http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/ehs/epirc/reports/lessons_learned/lessons_learned.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer)
    Office of Head Start, Administration for Children and Families
    This one-pager discusses trauma in the life of young children, including symptoms of trauma and suggestions for programs.
  • Military Families Resource Center
    (http://www.aacap.org/cs/MilitaryFamilies.ResourceCenter Exit Disclaimer)
    American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
    AACAP's military families resource center includes answers to frequently asked questions, facts for families, clinical resources, and information on how to get help.
  • The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
    (www.nctsn.org Exit Disclaimer)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    The National Child Traumatic Stress Network was established to improve access to care, treatment, and services for traumatized children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events. Their Web site offers a wide range of related resources.
  • National Child Traumatic Stress Network Resources (http://www.nctsnet.org/nccts/nav.do?pid=ctr_main Exit Disclaimer)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    These materials on child traumatic stress are arranged by audiences, topics, online research, training and education, public awareness, and sustainability.
  • Oil Spill Distress Resources
    (http://oilspilldistress.samhsa.gov/)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    This Web page was created to provide information, support, and counseling for families and children affected by the Gulf Coast oil spill. The Campaign includes a toll-free helpline (1-800-985-5990) for immediate assistance at regional crisis centers. Resources may be quite applicable to other survivors of disaster or other traumatic events.
  • Real Life Calls for Real Books: Literature to Help Children Cope with Family Stressors
    (http://www.naeyc.org/files/yc/file/200809/Crawford.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer)
    National Association for the Education of Young Children
  • Report of the Task Force on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Trauma in Children and Adolescents
    (http://www.apa.org/pi/families/resources/task-force/child-trauma.aspx Exit Disclaimer)
    American Psychological Association
    The primary goals of the task force are to identify "what we know" and "what we need to know" regarding the development and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in youth and to present current knowledge and information, as well as critical gaps in knowledge, about this important area. APA is proud to offer these resources for mental health professionals and policy makers courtesy of the 2008 Presidential Task Force on PTSD and trauma in children and adolescents.
  • Recognizing and Addressing Trauma in Infants, Young Children, and Their Families
    (http://www.ecmhc.org/tutorials/trauma/index.html Exit Disclaimer)
    Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation
    The purpose and overall goal of this online tutorial is to help early childhood mental health consultants as well as Early Head Start and Head Start staff understand what is meant by trauma, recognize the developmental context of trauma in early childhood, and extend their own knowledge for intervention through consultation.
  • Resilience and Stress Management
    (http://www.samhsa.gov/dtac/dbhis/dbhis_stress/resilience.htm)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    This Web site provides an explanation of what resilience is, its many forms, and how resilience can be promoted.
  • Resources for Helping Children, Families, and Early Childhood Educators Build Coping Skills
    (http://www.naeyc.org/files/yc/file/200809/CopingSkillsResources.pdf Exit Disclaimer)
    National Association for the Education of Young Children
  • Resources for Parents and Caregivers
    (http://nctsn.org/resources/audiences/parents-caregivers Exit Disclaimer)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    Parents and caregivers can play a very important role in helping children and adolescents recover from their traumatic experiences. These resources show how.
  • Resources for School Personnel
    (http://nctsn.org/resources/audiences/school-personnel Exit Disclaimer)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    These resources includes a toolkit for educators, background information, information on interventions, and more.
  • Safe Start Center Publications
    (http://www.safestartcenter.org/about/publications.php Exit Disclaimer)
    Safe Start, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
    Safe Start offers information regarding children's exposure to violence, including fact sheets and setting specific briefs, such as briefs focusing on pediatrics, schools, and homeless shelters.
  • Strengthening Families
    (www.strengtheningfamilies.net Exit Disclaimer)
    Center for the Study of Social Policy
    Across the country, early care and education programs, child welfare departments, and others are using these Strengthening Families approach to build five Protective Factors in families dealing with stress. Literature supporting this is available at http://strengtheningfamilies.net/images/uploads/pdf_uploads/LiteratureReview.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer.
  • StopBullying.gov
    (http://www.stopbullying.gov Exit Disclaimer)
    Department of Health & Human Services in partnership with the Department of Education and Department of Justice
    StopBullying.gov provides information from various government agencies on how kids, teens, young adults, parents, educators and others in the community can prevent or stop bullying.
  • Trauma and Justice
    (http://www.samhsa.gov/traumaJustice/)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    The following is SAMHSA's official website on trauma and justice.
  • Talking to Children about Community Violence
    (http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/resources_for_families/talking_to_children_about_community_violence Exit Disclaimer)
    American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
    Tips on how parents and teachers can discuss a tragic incident of community violence with children.
  • Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children
    (http://www.familyhomelessness.org/media/91.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer)
    National Center on Family Homelessness
    This booklet opens by defining trauma, then looks more closely at acute traumatic stress and complex trauma. For each aspect of trauma, there is a description of the most common developmental effects on children and ways for caregivers to respond to help children heal. To support caregivers, importance of self-care is highlighted, and a list of resources is provided.
  • Impact of Trauma on Wellness: Implications for Comprehensive Systems Change
    (http://www.esi-bethesda.com/10x10teleconference/ppt/ImpactOfTrauma.pdf [PDF] Exit Disclaimer)
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    This teleconference will educate diverse stakeholders about comprehensive systems change, including preventing harm and inadvertent retraumatization and ensuring that services and supports are welcoming, engaging, and culturally attuned. The goal is to help facilitate the healing process among people who have experienced trauma so that they can become fully engaged in their communities.

If you or someone you know is in crisis and needs to talk, please call 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).

Return to main page of SAMHSA.gov/Children | For more information, click here to email AwarenessDay2014@vancomm.com